Stroke: What is the brain condition and what are the symptoms?

On Thursday 26 April, Stroke Association , the UK’s leading stroke charity, launched its first TV advert.

The advert highlights the threat to life the medical condition poses to people across all age groups, and has been praised on social media for showing the importance of recognising the impact the condition can have on people’s lives.

More than 40,000 people died of stroke in the UK in 2015, which equates to one death every 13 minutes.

Stroke Association states that it’s the fourth leading cause of death in the UK, and the cause of 400 childhood deaths across the country every year.

There are different types of strokes and recovery length depends on the severity of the attack. Created with Sketch. The six stages of passing a medical

Show all 7 Created with Sketch. Created with Sketch. Created with Sketch. The six stages of passing a medical

1/7 The six stages of a football medical

Dr Ramzy Ross, Head of Sports and Human Performance at nanoM – a state of the art integrated health assessment clinic for the world of professional sports – shares his thoughts on the subject.

The purpose of a medical is to profile a player in relation to the status of their medical and physical fitness. Contrary to what many believe, it isn’t simply a pass/fail scenario, but instead one where the results, and expert opinions, are put forward to the relevant stake holders in order for them to decide on the potential risks versus benefits of signing that player.

While there is no rigid medical process in place which clubs have to adhere to, there are six phases of a football medical that clubs will loosely follow which are outlined by the Football Medical Association (FMA) – the representative body for all medical, science and exercise personnel in professional league football, within the UK). Tottenham Hotspur FC via Getty I 2/7 1. Heart analysis

Perhaps the most crucial element of any football medical, players will undergo a series of checks which include assessing the structure and function of the heart. Players will have an electrocardiogram (ECG), which checks the heart’s rhythm and electrical activity at rest and during exercise and with further tests, such as an echocardiogram, to assess heart structure and function. Tests of this nature are crucial to assess the baseline of any sports person, at any level, and our cardiological assessments look into heart muscle structure and functionality. Inter via Getty Images 3/7 2 and 3. Musculoskeletal Profiling

The club performance specialists, physios or doctor will also test the functional capabilities of the player’s key muscles and joints and, in football, this is in particular relation to lower limb muscles and joints looking for any potential weaknesses but also looking at potential strengths. Using the latest technologies including functional isokinetics and range of motion analysis detailed insights can be achieved.

In order to help detect existing injuries, help reduce the risk of potential future ones as well as for performance profiling purposes – the extensive analysis into the behaviour of muscles in fixed, as well as functional positions, is absolutely pivotal.

Focusing on the ratios between two muscle groups is also another key element of the football medical, in particular given the nature of the sport, looking at the balance between the hamstring and quadriceps muscles. Getty Images 4/7 2 and 3. Musculoskeletal Profiling

Footballers are usually quadriceps dominant, which in turn means they may suffer as a result of under conditioned hamstring muscles. Therefore, identifying those weaknesses during a medical and looking at the characteristics between these paired muscles is key to spotting potential weaknesses which may be present from a previous injury or could even help identify a potential injury which may occur in the future.

Another problem we see in footballers is weak glutes. The glutes are the muscles which extend over the hips and around the bottom. It is a large muscle group and if not engaged effectively, can result in more strain on the other muscles. It has a big role to play and is often overlooked.

AFP/Getty Images 5/7 4. Advanced scanning

In a situation where a player has recently recovered from an injury or they have experienced injury issues in the past, a magnetic resonance or ultrasound scan is often used by club doctors to look at the injury issue in more detail, not only to discover the extent of the problem but also to establish whether the injury has fully recovered. These tests provide specific information regarding diagnostic, as well as prognostic (i.e. outcome) of various musculoskeletal injuries. AFP/Getty Images 6/7 5. Body composition

Football clubs will test prospective players with Bioelectrical Impedance technology, which reads your body fat and is able to measure lean tissue and fat by sending an electrical signal around the body.

The majority of top football players will have a body fat percentage less than 13%. There can, however, be discrepancies from player to player from position to position. If you’re about to spend a small fortune on a new player, you want to know what kind of shape you can expect to find them in. AFP/Getty Images 7/7 6. All about Speed, Power and Endurance

Often the final phase of a football medical takes place in a human performance laboratory where players are put through their paces in a series of tests designed to measure sports-specific factors such as, in the case of football, speed, power and endurance capabilities.

Football is about coordination/agility, speed, power and endurance. Players are often analysed in terms of how quickly they can cover certain distances but also how well they perform during repeated sprints. This then leads into the endurance element – players need to be able to repeat such movements over a prolonged period of time – and so a cardio-metabolic exercise test can provide key insights into fitness levels of players and outcomes take into account positional requirements too.

Getty 1/7 The six stages of a football medical

Dr Ramzy Ross, Head of Sports and Human Performance at nanoM – a state of the art integrated health assessment clinic for the world of professional sports – shares his thoughts on the subject.

The purpose of a medical is to profile a player in relation to the status of their medical and physical fitness. Contrary to what many believe, it isn’t simply a pass/fail scenario, but instead one where the results, and expert opinions, are put forward to the relevant stake holders in order for them to decide on the potential risks versus benefits of signing that player.

While there is no rigid medical process in place which clubs have to adhere to, there are six phases of a football medical that clubs will loosely follow which are outlined by the Football Medical Association (FMA) – the representative body for all medical, science and exercise personnel in professional league football, within the UK). Tottenham Hotspur FC via Getty I 2/7 1. Heart analysis

Perhaps the most crucial element of any football medical, players will undergo a series of checks which include assessing the structure and function of the heart. Players will have an electrocardiogram (ECG), which checks the heart’s rhythm and electrical activity at rest and during exercise and with further tests, such as an echocardiogram, to assess heart structure and function. Tests of this nature are crucial to assess the baseline of any sports person, at any level, and our cardiological assessments look into heart muscle structure and functionality. Inter via Getty Images 3/7 2 and 3. Musculoskeletal Profiling

The club performance specialists, physios or doctor will also test the functional capabilities of the player’s key muscles and joints and, in football, this is in particular relation to lower limb muscles and joints looking for any potential weaknesses but also looking at potential strengths. Using the latest technologies including functional isokinetics and range of motion analysis detailed insights can be achieved.

In order to help detect existing injuries, help reduce the risk of potential future ones as well as for performance profiling purposes – the extensive analysis into the behaviour of muscles in fixed, as well as functional positions, is absolutely pivotal.

Focusing on the ratios between two muscle groups is also another key element of the football medical, in particular given the nature of the sport, looking at the balance between the hamstring and quadriceps muscles. Getty Images 4/7 2 and 3. Musculoskeletal Profiling

Footballers are usually quadriceps dominant, which in turn means they may suffer as a result of under conditioned hamstring muscles. Therefore, identifying those weaknesses during a medical and looking at the characteristics between these paired muscles is key to spotting potential weaknesses which may be present from a previous injury or could even help identify a potential injury which may occur in the future.

Another problem we see in footballers is weak glutes. The glutes are the muscles which extend over the hips […]

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